Teaching

At Penn State I have taught classes on the short story in world literature, banned books, and English composition and rhetoric. I am slated to teach “The African Novel” in spring 2019. Whether teaching literature or writing, my aim is to introduce students to the ways in which language–whether literary or otherwise–affects our reality. Balancing questions of language and aesthetics with sociopolitical context is therefore central to my approach to teaching African and postcolonial literatures. I frequently set students short research assignments to help them familiarize themselves with the individual contexts that we study. At the same time, however, I place great importance on close-readings (often done in groups or as a class) and on close attention to the linguistic and formal nuances of texts. Trained as a comparatist, my favorite moments in the classroom are those when students begin making their own informed comparisons between texts written in distant parts of the world.

Syllabi Taught at Penn State:
Fall 2018: CMLIT 130, “Banned Books.” (Adapted from Dr Jon Abel’s excellent syllabus for this course)

Spring 2018: ENGL 015, “Rhetoric and Composition.” (Syllabus created by Penn State’s Program in Writing in Rhetoric)

Fall 2017: ENGL 015, “Rhetoric and Composition.” (Syllabus created by Penn State’s Program in Writing in Rhetoric)

Spring 2017: CMLIT 184/ENGL 184, “The Short Story.”

Proposed Syllabi:
These syllabi are examples of the some of kinds of classes that I would like to teach in the future.

The Postcolonial Short Story (Lower-division world literature course)

Africa in Theory Syllabus (Graduate-level theory course)